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Jul 25

How Much Cycling Should I Do To Get To International Standards.?

Im trying to do about 1 – 2 hours of cycling a day. But in PE we go to the gym and I spend about an hour of constant cycling, I usually get about 16 odd miles. With out stopping or taking a 1 minuets break every 8 miles. But thats on the cycling machine.

6 comments

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  1. Old Hippie

    1) Get off the indoor trainer or cycling machine if the weather is even close to nice outside. Get on a real road bike. 2) Join a local cycling club & learn how to ride in a pack or the “peloton”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peloton You’ll need to learn how to ride shoulder-to-shoulder with the best of them. 3) You’ll need a lot more than 16 miles a day.

  2. Andymcj78 - Atheist

    At your age one or two hours a day is okay – professional cyclists have training regimes that might involve around 25 hours of intensive training a week. In the meantime you should forget about international standards and join a cycling club. Every professional cyclist began as a club cyclist who began cycling for fun and you don’t need to be focused on anything other than gradually developing your cycling proficiency.

  3. frank lynn

    One to two hours? You’re wasting your time, unless you plan on increasing the duration on a real bike. It’s not that you can pedal fast and far, it’s how you react to the people and race around you. If you are serious about riding and acheiving a serious rating, check out local bike clubs and rides. Visiting a real bike shop to speak to “someone in the know” would be helpful.

  4. nodopeno

    Gradually, over the next couple of years double the time to 4 hours a day and the speed to 32 mph. By next ridding season you should be able to do 50-60 miles and in 2014, you should be able to complete 100 miles. That will get you a little closer to your goal. Edit: You could be Olympic level by 2016.

  5. wleatlan

    ride about 300 miles a week, with an organized training program, which you design from bo oks or with a coach on a bike not a gym toy what you are doing now is nothing also the odds of becoming ‘professional’ are about 0 in 100000000 even if you were actually training which you are not wle

  6. BigE

    Unfortunately, cycling machines are a poor substitute for road work. All the calculations are done via some dude in the back room of the company that made the bike programming a chip. The only one that might be right is watts, because that can be easily measured.

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